Tue 09 July 19

Cost‐effectiveness of staffing levels on conflict and containment on psychiatric wards in England

Prior to the publication of this study, literature on staffing levels and outcomes in psychiatric wards was limited and shows mixed associations. There was a lack of economic evidence on conflicts and containment in psychiatric care. We used data from the City‐128 study that showed that regular qualified nurse staffing levels in the preceding shifts were associated with raised conflict and containment levels.

Muralikrishnan R. Kartha

Paul McCrone

https://doi.org/10.1111/jpm.12545

What is known on the subject?

 

  • Literature on staffing levels and outcomes in psychiatric wards is limited and shows mixed associations
  • Lack of economic evidence on conflicts and containment in psychiatric care
  • Data from the City‐128 study showed that regular qualified nurse staffing levels in the preceding shifts were associated with raised conflict and containment levels

 

What this paper adds to existing knowledge?

 

  • This is the first economic analysis using the City‐128 data, with costs and outcomes data have been combined.
  • Cost‐effectiveness of different staffing levels in relation to conflicts and containments in England, using data from the City‐128 study
  • Both day and night shifts appeared to show that the low staff scenario was cost‐effective in terms of conflicts and containment averted, even after attempts were made to adjust for patient severity

 

What are the implications for practice?

 

  • This paper could be an indication towards further investigation into how mental health inpatient care, specially nursing is organized in England.